Who negates your vote? The Electoral system and citizenship

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In years past, folks were required to show their birth certificate when registering to vote.  Usually this was accomplished through a local representative of the Registrar of Voters, who assured American votes belonged to citizens and were of legal age. As communities grew, and “rural” became “city”, the use of local registrars became impractical.

In years past, folks were required to show their birth certificate when registering to vote.  Usually this was accomplished through a local representative of the Registrar of Voters, who assured American votes belonged to citizens and were of legal age. As communities grew, and “rural” became “city”, the use of local registrars became impractical.

Today one can register via the Motor Voter Act, hard copy registration form by mail, in-person, on the Internet, or – now – by cell phone.  Cell phones can be tied to a national service with a paid, registered user or be a “throw away” cell phone – persons legality unknown. Thus, under the guise of “everybody is assured their vote”, we do not always know if “everybody” is doing so legally.

In the state of Florida (a “swing state”) many residents also hold residency in New York.  Nothing prevents them from voting twice and is common knowledge – at least in Florida (according to information given this writer while in Florida). How widespread this type voting is unknown, but indicates a potential problem there and elsewhere.

The hard copy voter registration form (only) requires marking a box that certifies citizenship. No one checks the validity of this registration form, and resultant ballot information is simply mailed to the person/address on the form.  There may be multiple people living at that address – or using that address – as is done with many school registrations.

At least in California, voting/ballot information can be available in several languages in order to reduce disenfranchisement.  For immigrants to become citizens they must be able to write and read English – at least minimally.

If one person in a household votes Democrat and another – Republican, it would seem to negate their votes.  Votes can also be negated by “illegal voting” of groups taking advantage of a system that forbids the use of identification. Recently the U.S. Justice Department sued various states to remove their voter identification laws, saying it is unfair for those who are poor, live long distances away and so on.

There can actually be more people registered to vote in a state than eligible people living in the state. Many states are heroically trying to “clean up” their files and assure only votes that are eligible, alive, and of human form.  Yet some of those states recently encountered resistance to their efforts by the Justice Department.  

In the general election whoever acquires the largest amount of votes in a state receives the entire electoral number. The electoral vote determines the Presidency.  Electoral votes are determined by the number of elected Representatives and Senators in a state; which is determined by population.  Article II of the U.S. Constitution is responsible for the electoral system.

For instance, if the majority of votes in California are for Barack Obama – even by one – then all the electoral votes will go to him. Every vote can count.

Recently President Barack Obama signed an Executive Order allowing illegal aliens to remain safely in the United States – those between the ages of 15 and 30 years – brought here by their parents. They must be in school, graduated or have served in the military.  There is now a question as to whether those who fall under the recent Executive Order will vote. They arrived illegally, stay here illegally.  Will they vote illegally?

Another issue regards military service and President Obama’s “Dream Act” Executive Order.  The President’s act did not give rights to those who have served in the military as is thought. It addresses those here illegally. Only citizens and legal residents can serve in the military. If they were not a legal resident to begin with they could not apply for President Obama’s “Dream Act” by saying they served in the military.  One has to come before the other. It has always been the rule to be able to apply for citizenship if you have served honorably in the military. The Dream Act did not do that.

The California State Senate has voted to give drivers licenses to illegal aliens falling under that same Executive Order category.  Utah, New Mexico and Washington State also give drivers licenses to illegal aliens.  If they have successfully registered to vote (since physical proof of citizenship is not required to register), begs the question that if having drivers licenses runs the risk of allowing folks to vote – as seemingly legal residents with a valid identification.

Overall, elected officials believe that the benefits (to vote) outweigh the risks (vote manipulation). Since “disenfranchisement” is now a popular issue, should all those whose vote do not count due to the electoral requirement also be considered disenfranchised? 

Our population has changed as have our mandates. Although not everyone’s vote will be negated, it would seem time to rethink the electoral system, and, while doing so, tighten the strings at the polls.

Who negates your vote? The Electoral system and citizenship

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